Religion and International Relations

Scholars and analysts studying with international relations are finally starting to pay some attention to the role of in diplomatic culture and foreign policy formulation.

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Leo P. Ribuffo reports that “at the June 2014 meeting of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), the six sessions dealing primarily … with religion outnumbered those dealing primarily with the Korean War (one), World War II (one) and World War I (non despite the centenary). Clearly this topic is coming into vogue.”

Ribuffo argues that “historians cannot understand the behavior of the American people past and present without paying serious attention to nationalism and religion—or, more precisely, religions, since religion is a weak category. The relationship between religions and foreign relations is more problematic.”

Historians cannot understand the behavior of the American people past and present without paying serious attention to nationalism and religion–or, more precisely, religions, since religion is a weak category. The relationship between religions and foreign relations is more problematic. – See more at: http://hnn.us/article/156246#sthash.YJGpxhcl.dpuf
At the June 2014 meeting of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), the six sessions dealing primarily and with religion outnumbered those dealing primarily with the Korean War (one), World War II (one) and World War I (none despite the centenary). Clearly this topic is coming into vogue. – See more at: http://hnn.us/article/156246#sthash.YJGpxhcl.dpuf
At the June 2014 meeting of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), the six sessions dealing primarily and with religion outnumbered those dealing primarily with the Korean War (one), World War II (one) and World War I (none despite the centenary). Clearly this topic is coming into vogue. – See more at: http://hnn.us/article/156246#sthash.YJGpxhcl.dpuf
At the June 2014 meeting of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), the six sessions dealing primarily and with religion outnumbered those dealing primarily with the Korean War (one), World War II (one) and World War I (none despite the centenary). Clearly this topic is coming into vogue. – See more at: http://hnn.us/article/156246#sthash.YJGpxhcl.dpuf

At the June 2014 meeting of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), the six sessions dealing primarily and with religion outnumbered those dealing primarily with the Korean War (one), World War II (one) and World War I (none despite the centenary). Clearly this topic is coming into vogue. – See more at: http://hnn.us/article/156246#sthash.YJGpxhcl.
At the June 2014 meeting of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), the six sessions dealing primarily and with religion outnumbered those dealing primarily with the Korean War (one), World War II (one) and World War I (none despite the centenary). Clearly this topic is coming into vogue. – See more at: http://hnn.us/article/156246#sthash.YJGpxhcl.dpuf

Ribuffo’s reflects on the relationships between religion and foreign relations in an article that appears in HNN.

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This entry was posted in Catholicism and Religious Violence, Christian-Muslim Violence, Christianity and Religious Violence, Concept of Religion, Protestantism and Religious Violence, Religion and International Relations, Religious Politics. Bookmark the permalink.

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