Category Archives: Historiography of Religious Violence

Religion and the Teaching of the Holocaust

Religious issues present complicated dilemmas in the teaching of many subjects. Instructors teaching about the Holocaust and other genocides confront complex histories , contentious politics, and traumatic legacies. The New York Times profiles Mehnaz M. Afridi, an Assistant Professor of … Continue reading

Posted in Ethics and Violence, Genocides, Historiography of Religious Violence, Holocaust, Islam and Religious Violence, Judaism and Religious Violence, Palestinian-Israeli Conflict, Research on Religious Violence | Leave a comment

When Politicians and Journalists “Go Medieval”

Pre-modern religious violence has been thrust once again into the political spotlight in the United States this week. The Islamic State (ISIS) diffused horrific videos and photos of its execution of a Jordanian pilot by immolation. People around the world … Continue reading

Posted in Christian-Muslim Violence, Christianity and Religious Violence, Crusades, Historiography of Religious Violence, Islam and Religious Violence, Religious Militants, Religious Politics, Religious Terrorism, Religious Violence, Religious Violence in the Media | Tagged | 1 Comment

Burial Politics and Intolerance in France

Burial politics and intolerance seem to have been involved in an incident concerning the burial of a Roma (gypsy) baby during the holidays in France. The mayor of the town of Champlan, where the baby lived and died, allegedly refused … Continue reading

Posted in Christianity and Religious Violence, Death and Burial Practices, European Wars of Religion, Historiography of Religious Violence, Human Rights and Religion, Iconoclasm, Law and Religious Intolerance, Purity and Pollution, Religious Intolerance, Religious Nationalism | 1 Comment

A Crisis in Secular Studies?

Religion and religious violence are evoked almost daily by politicians and journalists, who often distinguish between ‘religious’ and ‘secular’ politics. Jacques Berlinerblau, a professor at Georgetown University, questions popular and academic usages of ‘secularism’, which often seem contradictory. Berlinerblau argues … Continue reading

Posted in Comparative Religious Studies, Concept of Religion, Historiography of Religious Violence, Human Rights and Religion, Religion and Globalization, Religion and International Relations, Religious Intolerance, Religious Minorities, Religious Politics, Religious Violence in the Media, Research on Religious Violence, Secularism | Leave a comment

Camels in Religion, Science, and History

Archaeologists and other scientists are attempting to determine when camels were domesticated in the Arabian peninsula. Their findings question religious and historical accounts of early Jewish history. The New York Times reports: “There are too many camels in the Bible, … Continue reading

Posted in Historiography of Religious Violence, Judaism and Religious Violence, Religious Nationalism, Science and Religion | Leave a comment

Gender and Violence

A new issue of the Journal of International Affairs, entitled “The Gender Issue: Beyond Exclusion,” focuses on gender issues in global societies, including conflict zones. An article by Christine Chinkin and Mary Kaldor examines “Gender and the New Wars.”  Contributions … Continue reading

Posted in Gender and Religious Violence, Historiography of Religious Violence, Islam and Religious Violence, Religion and Globalization, Religious Nationalism, Religious Politics, Religious Terrorism, Research on Religious Violence | 1 Comment

Journal of Religion and Violence Special Issue

The Journal of Religion and Violence recently published a special issue on René Girard’s mimetic theory. Here is the table of contents: 1:2 – Table of Contents SPECIAL ISSUE: René Girard’s Mimetic Theory and its Contribution to the Study of … Continue reading

Posted in Graduate Studies of Religious Violence, Historiography of Religious Violence, Religious Politics, Religious Violence in the Media, Religious Violence Theories, Research on Religious Violence | 1 Comment